Spring hours

Santa Rosa Intercultural Center's Hours

We are closed during SPRING BREAK (March 18-22)

Spring Hours:

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 10am - 4pm

Tuesday: 10am - 7pm

Fridays by appointment only

Native American History Month

Join us as we honor, celebrate, and highlight Native American history and those currently working to strengthen the Native American community today.

ASL Interpreters available upon request: To request interpreting services to access this event, please contact the Interpreting Services Office at least one week prior to the event to make arrangements. InterpretingServices@santarosa.edu, or send a text to (707) 230-3895.

All events are free, and open to the public, unless stated otherwise

Workshops, seminars and conferences are eligible for PGI. If you would like us to assist you with proof of attendance, please reach out to intercultural@santarosa.edu. These events can be reported for professional development credit with Forever Flex code FF:29- Native American History Month Events. 


  

   Image with the words of the event title.

Considering Anti-Colonial Futures with Indigenous Education and Youth in the Marrow Thieves

Wednesday, November 1 | 12:00 - 1:00 pm

Newman Auditorium

In this talk, three collaborators (Melissa Horner, Métis/ Anishinaabe; Joaquin Muñoz, Pascua Yaqui; Robert Petrone) will explore the confluence of Indigenous culture and education, while critiquing settler colonialism and uplifting Indigenous young adult literature.


 

   Photograh of Ruben Crowfeather looking at the camera wearing ceremonial regelia

Preserving Indigenous Cultures

Thursday, November 2 | 11:00 - 12:00 pm

Our House Intercultural Center(Jacobs 116)/Zoom

Join Reuben Crowfeather at Our House (Jacobs 116) from 11 AM-12 PM on Thursday November 2 for a discussion on how he continues to preserve his tribes cultures, language, identity, and customs.

Reuben Crowfeather is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation now resides in Santa Rosa with his wife and kids. Reuben is a traditional dancer, singer, and Eyapaha (master of ceremonies) for his tribe. He is passionate about sharing the teachings that have been passed down to him. Reuben’s educational background is in Addiction Studies. Another passion for Reuben is planting seeds of addiction prevention in our youth using non-western modalities. He currently works as a cultural/spiritual mentor in Sonoma County and Bay Area. Reuben will discussing how Indigenous cultures have evolved and continue to evolve, how they continue to practice their culture, customs, and preserve their language."


   photograph of three people looking at the camera smiling. One in the middle is looking off to the right holding a basket.

Roles, Rules, & Responsibility: Northern California Two-Spirit Weavers

Friday, November 3 | 4:00 - 6:00 pm

SRJC Multicultural Museum, Bussman Hall

This exhibit displays the talents of three Northern California Indian [two spirit] weavers; Silver Galleto (Southern Pomo/Coast Miwok), Jarred Lincoln-Stremberg (Karuk), and Augustine Granados-Young (Maidu) who found healing and identity through traditional weaving. Each weaver from their own respective tribes have honed their talents and developed their love of traditional weaving as a way to heal themselves and revitalize and strengthen their ties to their cultures. While each weaver comes from a different culture, some of the traditions parallel each other, and further show that weaving must be shared to ensure its survival regardless of it’s done by a male or female- the preservation is the priority.

 

 


   cover of "The Marrow Thieves" image of the face of a person with white face paint as a stripe going down their cheek

All Our Relations Reading Group: Scholarship on the Marrow Thieves

Tuesday, November 7 | 12:00 - 1:30 pm

Zoom Meeting ID: 863 2136 1063

Dr. Churchill and Dr. Tom facilitate the All Our Relations Reading Group to provide opportunities for students, faculty, staff, and the public to read texts and join in conversations about issues in Native American Studies, Indigenous Studies, Environmental Studies, and all areas that allow us to explore our connectedness with all our relations. This semester, we are excited to feature the young adult novel The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline (Métis), scholarship on The Marrow Thieves by PhD Candidate Melissa Horner (Métis/Anishinaabe), Dr. Joaquin Muñoz (Pascua Yaqui), and Dr. Robert Petrone, and Deer Woman: Anthology, edited by Elizabeth LaPensée and Weshoyot Alvitre.


   

  painting of folks sitting at a fire at night from which different shadow animals come out of

Wintertime Storytelling Session

Tuesday, November 14 | 5:00 - 6:30 pm

Santa Rosa Intercultural Center, Pioneer 380

Wintertime storytelling session includes a history of oral tradition within Indigenous cultures in US and Canada. Origin stories, ghost stories, bigfoot stories, oral history, oral tradition, supernatural and more. Presented by Lori Laiwa Thomas, Native American Studies Instructor, Department of Ethnic Studies.

 


 

photograph of dry grass burning while half a dozen people are tending to it
photo by ALYSHA BECK-UC DAVIS

CULTURAL FIRE: RESTORING RELATIONS

Wednesday, November 15 | 11:30am - 12:30 pm

Santa Rosa Intercultural Center, Pioneer 380

The Honorable Ron W. Goode, Chairman of the North Fork Mono Tribe, teaches and speaks internationally on cultural burning. Joined by Dr. Erica Tom and students, this event will explore the power of restoring our relationship to the land, plants, animals, ourselves, and each other.

   


   photograph of different size woven baskets lined up on display

Elsie Allen Pomo Basket Collection: Songs, History, and Videos of Pomo Basketweavers.

Tuesday, November 21 | 6:00 - 7:30 pm

Santa Rosa Intercultural Center, Pioneer 380

A collaboration between Linda Aguilar (Elsie Allen Granddaughter), Rachel Minor, SRJC Multicultural Museum Supervisor/Curator, and Lori Laiwa Thomas, Native American Studies Instructor-Ethnic Studies. A discussion will take place about Allen family narratives, the history about the multicultural museum at SRJC, and rare video footage of Pomo weavers from the Mendocino County area, including Elsie Allen, her mother, Annie Burke, and more.


   picture of flower tortillas

Let's Make Torts! (tortillas, tlaxcalli, xita) 

Tuesday, November 28 | 6:00 - 7:30 pm

Bertolini Student Activities Center

Join this hands-on workshop to learn about this history of both wheat and corn torts/tortillas, how the process has stayed the same and/or transformed, and practice making some! SRJC faculty Lori Thomas and staff Malena Hernandez will be sharing Pomo and Mexican traditions.


   a pencil sketch of a dear bust with think antlers. Above it reads "Deer Woman"

All Our Relations Reading Group: Deer Woman, An Anthology

Thursday, November 30 | 4:00 - 5:30 pm

Santa Rosa Intercultural Center, Pioneer 380

Dr. Churchill and Dr. Tom facilitate the All Our Relations Reading Group to provide opportunities for students, faculty, staff, and the public to read texts and join in conversations about issues in Native American Studies, Indigenous Studies, Environmental Studies, and all areas that allow us to explore our connectedness with all our relations. This semester, we are excited to feature the young adult novel The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline (Métis), scholarship on The Marrow Thieves by PhD Candidate Melissa Horner (Métis/Anishinaabe), Dr. Joaquin Muñoz (Pascua Yaqui), and Dr. Robert Petrone, and Deer Woman: Anthology, edited by Elizabeth LaPensée and Weshoyot Alvitre.

Contact us

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Pioneer Hall 380
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Text: 
(707) 527-4741

 

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email:
intercultural@santarosa.edu

 

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call: 
(707) 527-4741